All you needs is a little RESPECT

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Katie Molnar enjoys the sense of self-achievement she gets from learning

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BIBLE HILL, N.S. – You may know her as Katie Molnar; others may know her as “Little Lugene.” And as with any good nickname, there is a story.

Johanna Matthews photo - Katie Molnar, a recent graduate from the Dalhousie Agricultural Campus, was the recipient of the Health Education Award at this year’s IMPACT awards. The Health Education Award is given to a student leader who, through the creative use of resources, has enhanced the quality of student life and development on this campus.
Johanna Matthews photo – Katie Molnar, a recent graduate from the Dalhousie Agricultural Campus, was the recipient of the Health Education Award at this year’s IMPACT awards. The Health Education Award is given to a student leader who, through the creative use of resources, has enhanced the quality of student life and development on this campus.
A native of Lantz, N.S., Molnar worked very closely with Lugene Young, the manager of Health Services in the department of Student Services on the Dalhousie Agricultural Campus during the summer of 2014. Here she discovered her passion for learning and promoting health and wellness.

“Lugene became a mentor to me and as we started working together more, the Student Services team noticed that we had very similar personalities and they began to call me ‘Little Lugene,’” explained Molnar.

Learning gives her a feeling of self-achievement.

“I feel the more I learn, the more that I have to share and help the people around me. Knowledge is power,” she said.

Molnar’s passion and dedication to promoting health and wellness led to her receiving the Health Education Award at this year’s IMPACT awards. The Health Education Award is given to a student leader who, through the creative use of resources, has enhanced the quality of student life and development on this campus.

“I feel really honoured to even be nominated for an Impact Award and to actually win one feels surreal. It is such a great feeling to be noticed and appreciated for all of the work that I put into health education.”

Molnar has been actively involved with RESPECT on the Agricultural Campus. RESPECT is an acronym that stands for Real Energy Supporting Peer Education on Current Topics. The RESPECT team this year consisted of two students, Abbey Martin and Molnar. They worked collaboratively with Health Services and Student Services to promote and educate their peers to adopt health enhancing behaviours and attitudes to create a healthy campus environment.

“We provide health education outreach on topics such as sexual health, responsible drinking, stress management, healthy eating, active living and positive body image to name a few,” Molnar explained.

“After working at Student Service and seeing the positive impact that everyone in the office has on students, I was really inspired to be a part of enhancing students’ lives here on campus. Promoting health and wellness was the perfect opportunity for me to do this and also learn more about the health field, which I have been interested in entering.”

Her time here at the AC has been a learning experience.

“I have grown a lot, academically and personally. I am the same person that I was four years ago when I started here at the AC, but a better version. I have gained so many friends and mentors – it’s like I now have a second family!”

Right now she is unsure what the future holds. Following convocation, Molnar will be working at a dairy farm throughout the summer, however, she can definitely see herself returning to school in the near future and eventually pursuing work in the health field, whether it be with humans or animals.

Her words of wisdom to any future grads?

“I know this may sound cliché, but ‘what is meant to be will be’. What I mean by this is to work hard for what you want but don’t get discouraged when something doesn’t work out the way you want it to. Use rejection and so-called failure as a learning experience to make you work harder.”

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