Privateer Farmers’ Market to stay outside

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By Barb McKenna
LIVERPOOL, N.S. – The Privateers Farmers Market has been denied an application to build a permanent multi-use structure on Liverpool’s waterfront.

The farmers’ market had asked the Region of Queens Municipality to look into using federal infrastructure money to help build a permanent home for the market – which is now held outside in stalls on Henry Hensey Drive from May to October.

However, at its April 12 council meeting, the region decided against the application.

In its decision to deny the application, council considered that the region already has other buildings that need increased usage, like the Town Hall Arts and Cultural Centre, the former Court House, Queens Place Emera Centre, and the Liverpool Visitor Information Centr

The Privateer Farmers' Market will have to operate outside this year after the region turned down a request for a building. TC Media photo 
The Privateer Farmers’ Market will have to operate outside this year after the region turned down a request for a building. TC Media photo

e.

It said a new structure would have to find other users for the six and a half days a week the farmer’s market was not in operation, and would also require a system for bookings and maintenance.

The region also doubted that such a building would qualify for the federal government’s infrastructure program.

“In any event, RQM would be required to provide some funding commitment to this project, and does not have such funds this upcoming fiscal year,” said a report on the project done for the region.

“Rather than build up expectations of the Region being able to erect a new structure for the market when dollars are clearly not in the fiscal budget for such projects, it is  recommended that staff works with the group to investigate alternative existing locations for their half-day per week market, for times of inclement weather in summer and during the October-May period,” said the report.

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