Eating healthy with high food prices

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Small changes equal big differences

By Evan Careen
In times of ever-increasing food prices it can be hard to eat healthy and maintain a budget. Jessica Dahn, food security co-ordinator for the Community Food Hub in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, said it’s important to remember that small changes can make a big difference.

Jessica Dahn, food security co-ordinator for the Community Food Hub in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, said engaging such activities as hunting and farming can help cut food costs. Aurora file photo
Jessica Dahn, food security co-ordinator for the Community Food Hub in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, said engaging such activities as hunting and farming can help cut food costs. Aurora file photo
“It can be frustrating going to the grocery store and seeing the price of so many healthy products skyrocketing, but it’s important to remember that health should be our number one priority,” she said. “My view is that the solution for us in Happy Valley-Goose Bay starts right here in our town. First, what can we do at home and then what can we do as a community.”

Dahn said one of the things people can do at home is grow some of their own food. There are local businesses that have the knowledge and products required to start a home garden, she said, which can provide people with both fresh vegetables in the summer and the option of preserving them for the winter months. The Community Food Hub is working on bringing a community garden to town, Dahn said, which will help people who want to learn more and those who just need more space to grow.

Another way people can help lower the cost at the grocery store is taking advantage of the land, Dahn said.

“Rising food cost is a global issue. Here in Happy Valley – Goose Bay we have a unique landscape and environment that allows us the opportunity to easily access the land and all that it has to offer,” Dahn said. “Go fishing! Wild game, mushrooms, berries and edible plants are abundant; you can take a hunters education course or buy a book about wild edible plants of Labrador to learn more.”

Dahn said as a community it is important for the people of the Upper Lake Melville area to come together and develop the local food system. Ways to do this are by supporting local farmers and businesses, visiting the weekly market during the summer, buying what is in season, and preserving these local vegetables for the winter.

Dahn said there is a young farmers workshop at the Nunacor Komatik conference room on March 21 for those interested in learning more.

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